Dallas Poker Scene Crippled (again)

by , Nov 18, 2006 | 8:01 pm

Is it premature to declare the death of the Dallas poker scene?

Probably so. Games will change — as they did after the last SWAT-team raid) — and certainly some will survive … I’ve learned of at least one room in North Dallas that heard about the raids going down but did not inform the players and kept the action moving. (“[The manager] told us we were fine,” a dealer reports, “but I was so scared I was practically shaking in the box.”) Whatever happens, it seems clear that Dallas poker glory, as of last night, is not going to ever get back to what it once used to be — at least not until Texas Hold’em is legalized south of Oklahoma / west of Louisiana / east of New Mexico / north of Mexico.

Does anyone know, how’s the action around town tonight?

Ed. Note: Pokerati is not in the business of ratting out referring to legally questionable poker establishments by their proper names … at least not until they get busted to the extent that their business becomes part of the public record. Or until they put up websites like this one.

UPDATE: The “Shmounder Shmlub” is apparently suspending operations. At least for tonight.

UPDATE: Upon getting a phone call at “Mr. Kotter’s” game (in Dallas), management told the players about the three raids immediately and cashed them all out. Finishing the hand they were on, of course. Am guessing the remaining action went “check-check-check-check-check …”


6 Comments to “Dallas Poker Scene Crippled (again)”


  1. TommyTwoToes
    says:

    the thing that the police already know where these places are and what their names are. to not know would mean they are idiots(ok maybe they dont know).

    Jackies was in the same place for years….. everyone knew where it was… and they left it alone cause they were not causing a stir. hell as the other posters pointed out the hand-job girls from next door came out to see what was going on. i am sure that the police know what they are doing there also… this has to be someones personal agenda or the following:

    its sort of a theory of mine that governments often make illegal and crack down on the things that they eventually will legalize and then turn into a taxable and controllable revenue. they have escalated this war on poker in a means to that end.

    I am interested in weather or not there was undercover in there or not… or if there was some kind of warrant etc. every time a room has been busted it has been cause they have not properly screened the players coming in. Granted screening players is often a hard task. maybe some of them ought to hire PI’s to run background checks on people.


  2. DanM
    says:

    Granted screening players is often a hard task. maybe some of them ought to hire PI’s to run background checks on people.

    Yeah, but if the games have to go that underground … and where it suddenly costs so much more to get a new player … well then it’s such a private game (presumably with only high-stakes players) that turns the whole operation into something with the potential to be even more criminal. like you know, if we were members of that club, we could end up running a cocaine distribution center.


  3. Steve W
    says:

    Where I was playing last night, we got calls almost immeditaely after the busts happened. We continued playing, and I felt pretty good that we wouldn’t get busted. That place is a lot lower profile than JBs, jackies, or Aces and also the location is more secure, being located in a high-end apartment with security. Even if the police showed up, the guy at the front desk would have had time to call up with a warning.

    I think that’s what the games will have to evolve to: more secure, residential, and more private, rather than being run like a business and trying to generate a large volume of play.


  4. DanM
    says:

    That makes a lot of sense, Steve.


  5. Steve W Geniousness
    says:

    Yeah Steve, I am sure the front desk guy is going to put his neck out there for ya. You sound as safe as the Bellagio.

    Arent you the same jackass that posted JB’s info / address on here? If you are, shut the fuck up.


  6. Scott Chaffin
    says:

    The problem with this idea: “more secure, residential, and more private, rather than being run like a business and trying to generate a large volume of play” is generating enough business to make it worth your time to run the game. I’ve got some ideas on how to do it, but not the time.