Re: How a Bill May or May Not Become a Law

by , Sep 29, 2007 | 2:56 pm

As testament to the notion that poker is not a partisan issue, Pete Sessions (R-TX) is not the only Republican brought onto our bandwagon … other GOP’ers that have signed on as co-sponsors to the Wexler Bill / Skill Game Protection Act this month:

Rep. Connie Mack (R-FL)
Rep. Don Young (R-AK)
Rep. Jon Porter (R-NV)

According to the PPA’s chief lobbyist: “Picked up three Rs this week for Wexler, so not bad but long way to go.”

True enough, but a good start as it seems Sessions might already be delivering on his promises as others in his party follow suit.

Semi-related … here’s an interesting article from a non-poker financial writer on the fiscal viability of “skill games,” pointing out that the online poker biz is currently raking in $164-per-second, and number that could grow to $412 a second by 2011 … and as fast as the internet is growing, skill games have grown at four times that rate.


3 Comments to “Re: How a Bill May or May Not Become a Law”


  1. Johnnie Walker
    says:

    I agree that online poker generates a ton of revenue, no argument there. However, this attached article does not say anything to the effect that online poker is making this money but skill-based games, of which poker is one.

    If you were to play on a site where you could play Halo 3 competitively for money, I would imagine this also would be considered a skill game.

    On another note altogether, I still cannot believe that the WPT has not made any formal announcement about their truck crash fatality transporting their set to Tunica. At Borgata, Linda Johnson spoke to the audience about the damaged set but was not allowed to mention the fatality. Interesting that when one of their own passes on, they throw a tournament at the Bike and ask for donations for the family and when it’s a contracted employee…nothing.


  2. DanM
    says:

    ***If you were to play on a site where you could play Halo 3 competitively for money, I would imagine this also would be considered a skill game.***

    The bill does specify the games it covers, but you are right. In fact, that’s why, imho, these online poker issues being argued in the courts and halls of congress are about much more than just poker.


  3. California Jen
    says:

    JohnnieWalker, I agree that WPT should have – at the very least – made a public announcement and expressed their condolences to the family of the deceased. In their defense, however, they did give the statement to me for the post I did recently, and I wouldn’t doubt that they’ve made some kind gestures to the guy’s family.

    The WPT works in mysterious ways.